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Badges to Distinguish Rank...

Epaulettes, Shoulder Straps, Chevrons,

(Above this line - not in original printing)

BADGES TO DISTINGUISH RANK.

Epaulettes

1525. For the Major-General Commanding the Army--gold, with solid crescent; device, three silver-embroidered stars, one, one and a half inches in diameter, one and one-fourth inches in diameter, one, one and one-eighth inches in diameter, placed on the strap in a row, longitudinally, and equidistant, the largest star in the centre of the crescent, the smallest at the top; dead and bright bullion, one-half inch in diameter and three and one-half inches long.

1526. For all other Major-Generals--the same as for the Major-General Commanding the Army, except that there will be two stars on the strap instead of three, omitting the smallest. 1527. For a Brigadier General--the same as for the Major-General, except that instead of two, there shall be one star (omitting the smallest) placed upon the strap, and not with the crescent. 1528. For a Colonel--the same as for a Brigadier General, substituting a silver-embroidered spread eagle for the star upon the strap; and within the crescent for the Medical Department--a laurel wreath embroidered in gold, and the letters M.S., in old English characters, in silver, within the wreath; Pay Department--same as the Medical Department, with the letters P.D., in old English characters, Corps of Engineers--a turreted castle of silver; Corps of Topographical Engineers- a shield embroidered on gold, and below it the letter T.E., in old English characters, in silver; Ordnance Department--shell and flame in silver embroidery; Regimental Officers--the number of the regiment embroidered in gold, within a circlet of embroidered silver, one and three-fourths inches in diameter, upon cloth of the following colors: for Artillery--scarlet; Infantry--light or sky blue; Cavalry--yellow.

1529. For a Lieutenant-Colonel--the same as for a Colonel, according to corps, but substituting for the eagle a silver-embroidered leaf.

1530. For a Major--the same as for a Colonel, according to corps, omitting the eagle.

1531. For a Captain--the same as for a Colonel, according to corps, except that the bullion will be only one-fourth of an inch in diameter, and two and one-half inches long, and substituting for the eagle two silver-embroidered bars.

1532. For a First Lieutenant--the same as for a Colonel, according to corps, except that the bullion will be only one-eighth of an inch in diameter, and two and one-half inches long, and substituting for the eagle one silver-embroidered bars.

1533. For a Second Lieutenant--the same as for a First Lieutenant omitting the bar.

1534. For a Brevet Second Lieutenant--the same as for a Second Lieutenant.

1535. All officers having military rank will wear an epaulette on each shoulder.

1536. The epaulette may be dispensed with when not on duty, and on certain duties off parade, to wit: at drills, at inspections of barracks and hospitals, on Courts of Inquiry and Boards, at inspections of articles and necessaries, on working parties and fatigue duties, and upon the march, except when,
in war, there is immediate expectation of meeting the enemy, and also when the overcoat is worn.

Shoulder-Straps

1537. For the Major-General Commanding the Army--dark blue cloth, one and three eighths inches wide by four inches long; bordered with an embroidery of gold one-fourth of an inch wide; three silver-embroidered stars of five rays, one star on the centre of the strap, and one on each side equidistant between the center and the outer edge of the strap; the centre star to be the largest.

1538. For all other Major-Generals--the same as for the Major-General Commanding the Army, except that there will be two stars on the strap instead of three, the centre of each star to be one inch from the outer edge of the gold embroidery on the ends of the strap; both star of the same size.

1539. For a Brigadier General--the same as for the Major-General, except that instead of two, there shall be one star instead of two; the centre of the star to be equidistant from the outer edge of the embroidery on the ends of the strap .

1540. For a Colonel--the same as for a Major-General, and bordered in like manner with an embroidery of gold; a silver-embroidered spread eagle on the centre of the strap; two inches between the tips of the wings, having in its right talon an olive-branch, and in the left a bundle of arrows; an escutcheon on the breast, as represented in the arms of the United States cloth of the strap as follows: For the General Staff and Staff Corps--dark blue; for Artillery--scarlet; Infantry--light or sky blue; Cavalry--yellow.

1541. For a Lieutenant-Colonel--the same as for a Colonel, according to corps, but omitting the eagle, and introducing a silver-embroidered leaf at each end, each leaf extending seven-eighths of an inch from the end border of the strap.

1542. For a Major--the same as for a Colonel, according to corps, omitting the eagle, and introducing a gold-embroidered leaf at each end, each leaf extending seven-eighths of an inch from the end border of the strap.

1543. For a Captain--the same as for a Colonel, according to corps, and introducing at each end two gold-embroidered bars of the same width as the border, placed parallel to the ends of the strap, at a distance from the border equal to its width.

1544. For a First Lieutenant--the same as for a Colonel, according to corps, omitting the eagle, and introducing at each end one gold-embroidered bar of the same width as the border, placed parallel to the ends of the strap, at a distance from the border equal to its width.

1545. For a Second Lieutenant--the same as for a the same as for a Colonel, according to corps omitting the eagle.

1546. For a Brevet Second Lieutenant--the same as for a Second Lieutenant.

1547. For a Medical Cadet--a strip of gold lace three inches long, half an inch wide, placed in the middle of a strap of green cloth three and three-quarter inches long by one and one-quarter inches wide.

1548. The shoulder-strap will be worn whenever the epaulette is not.

Chevron

1549. The rank of non-commissioned officers will be marked by chevrons upon both sleeves of the uniform coat and overcoat, above the elbow, of silk or worsted binding one-half an inch wide, same color as the edging on the coat, points down, as follows:

1550. For A Sergeant Major--three bars and an arc, in silk.
1551. For a Quartermaster Sergeant--three bars and a tie, in silk.
1552. For an Ordnance Sergeant--three bars and a star, in silk.
1553. For a Hospital Steward--a half chevron of the following description,--viz.: of emerald green cloth, one and three-fourths inches wide, running obliquely downward from the outer to the inner seam of the sleeve, and at an angle of about thirty degrees with a horizontal, parallel to, and one-eighth of an inch distant from, both the upper and lower edge, an embroidery of yellow silk one-eighth of an inch wide, and in the centre a "caduceus" two inches long, embroidered also with yellow silk, the head toward the outer seam of the sleeve.
1554. For a First Sergeant--three bars and a lozenge, in worsted.
1555. For a Sergeant--three bars, in worsted.
1556. For a Corporal--two bars, in worsted.
1557. For a Pioneer--two crossed hatchets of cloth, same color and material as the edging of the collar, to be sewed on each arm above the elbow in the place indicated for a chevron, (those of a corporal to be just above and resting on the chevron), the head of the hatchet upward, its edge outward, of the following dimensions, viz.: Handle--four and one-half inches long, one-fourth to one-third inch wide. Hatchet--two inches long, one inch wide at the edge.
1558. To indicate service--all non-commissioned officers, musicians and privates, who have served faithfully for the term of five years, will wear, as a mark of distinction, upon both sleeves of the uniform coat, below the elbow, a diagonal chevron, one-half an inch wide, extending from seam to seam, the front end nearest the cuff, and one-half an inch above the point of the cuff, to be of the same color as the edging on the coat. In like manner, an additional half chevron, above and parallel to the first, for every subsequent five years of faithful service; distance between each chevron one-fourth of an inch. Service in war will be indicated by a light or sky blue stripe on each side of the chevron for Artillery, and a red stripe for all other corps, the stripe to be one-eighth of an inch wide.



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Index to Text of 1861 Uniform Regulations